Results 1 to 5 of 5

Thread: Are The Legacy Carriers missing the point?

  1. #1
    Newbie Member johnyk56's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Company
    Endeavor Airlines
    Base
    DSM
    Job
    Aircraft Maintenance Foreman
    Posts
    1
    Level
    7
    Points: 366, Level: 7
    Overall activity: 0%
    Achievements:
    3 months registeredTagger Second Class250 Experience Points
    Thumbs Up/Down
    Received: 1/0
    Given: 0/0

    Ignore User

    Post Are The Legacy Carriers missing the point?


    1 Not allowed! Not allowed!
    As a long time Aircraft Maintenance Manager I have seen a trend of poor utilization of resources exhibited by a majority of Mainline carriers that subcontract Regional Airlines.
    Regional airlines operate as Subcontractors, Utilizing smaller aircraft for smaller markets. Giving the Mainline connectivity to it's routes and name recognition in smaller markets. With the added benefit of having quality control over the Regional while having limited financial and regulatory obligations.

    All Regional airlines share some of the same basic issues when it comes to Aircraft Maintenance. They have to maintain all of the same safety, regulatory and training standards as the Legacy Carriers, while keeping their costs down. They require a highly skilled workforce, but generally pay lower wages then the
    Main Line. Due of the limited budgets of Regional airlines, a new or inexperienced Aircraft Mechanic at a Regional airline makes less then most car mechanics. Making it hard for Regional's to maintain a solid work force.


    Regional airlines offer a young aircraft technician an opportunity to learn the trade, trouble shoot skills on various Aircraft Systems, learn how to use the Manuals, clear understanding of Procedures and Record Keeping and various computer skills, and they do this in a small nurturing environment where talent and skills are shared.


    Main Line carriers should seize the opportunity they have created. When they entrust a Regional Airline to wear their brand and livery They should have an obligation to the Regional's a well.Let the Regional's do all of the leg work, let them train dedicated professional Aircraft Technicians and after a set amount of years give Regional mechanics a stepping stone to get an Aircraft Maintenance job with the Mainline. This is a win-win for everyone.



    The win for the Regional is that they can now keep their labor cost down, they would know how long a their average mechanic will stay in the company. Very few mechanics would ever reach the top scale pay before they moved on to a Mainline carrier. The hiring process would be less strained by offering new hire candidates the potential to move up to a Mainline.
    Regional's will have to pay their maintenance leadership positions appropriately, in general they would benefit from a work force that changes every 5 or so years. Generally the Regional's have a portion of their maintenance facilities in the smaller markets. Making aircraft maintenance jobs in a smaller cities limited mostly to Regional Airlines.


    Just recently a Regional that had went through a bankruptcy negotiated an agreement with their pilots and the Mainline carrier. As positions became available the Mainline would extend offers to the high time pilots of the Regional Airline.


    Time will show this is a good policy, it helps with employee moral and gives the mainline less of a learning curve. That was a good start by the Mainline, they should extend the same offer to the well deserved Professional Aircraft Maintenance Technicians that keep their Livery flying.
    John K.

  2. #2
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Posts
    76
    Level
    43
    Points: 4,675, Level: 43
    Overall activity: 4.0%
    Achievements:
    1000 Experience PointsVeteran
    Thumbs Up/Down
    Received: 7/0
    Given: 80/11

    Ignore User

    0 Not allowed! Not allowed!
    With my 22 years at a "regional airline", as a pilot, I thought this was the plan! There is one small problem in the plan, the "Majors", haven't hired a pilot in over 17 years!!

  3. #3
    Super Moderator Cujo665's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Company
    A great one
    Base
    Home Based
    Job
    Pilot
    A/C Flown
    SF340, E145, B767
    Posts
    2,362
    Level
    100
    Points: 47,961, Level: 100
    Overall activity: 8.0%
    Achievements:
    OverdriveVeteran25000 Experience PointsSocial
    Awards:
    Arm of Law
    Thumbs Up/Down
    Received: 370/50
    Given: 75/9

    Ignore User

    2 Not allowed! Not allowed!
    I called my wife using tapatalk from Veracruz MX. She asked why I was in Mexico. I told her, "because I'm a regional airline pilot based in NY."
    _______________________________________________

  4. #4
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Company
    Eagle
    Base
    DFW
    Job
    FO
    A/C Flown
    EMB, DHC-8
    Posts
    465
    Level
    42
    Points: 4,358, Level: 42
    Overall activity: 89.0%
    Achievements:
    1000 Experience PointsVeteran
    Thumbs Up/Down
    Received: 31/0
    Given: 0/1

    Ignore User

    0 Not allowed! Not allowed!
    Nice.

  5. #5
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Posts
    28
    Level
    41
    Points: 4,330, Level: 41
    Overall activity: 16.0%
    Achievements:
    1000 Experience PointsVeteran
    Thumbs Up/Down
    Received: 4/0
    Given: 0/0

    Ignore User

    0 Not allowed! Not allowed!
    Quote Originally Posted by johnyk56 View Post
    As a long time Aircraft Maintenance Manager I have seen a trend of poor utilization of resources exhibited by a majority of Mainline carriers that subcontract Regional Airlines.
    Regional airlines operate as Subcontractors, Utilizing smaller aircraft for smaller markets. Giving the Mainline connectivity to it's routes and name recognition in smaller markets. With the added benefit of having quality control over the Regional while having limited financial and regulatory obligations.

    All Regional airlines share some of the same basic issues when it comes to Aircraft Maintenance. They have to maintain all of the same safety, regulatory and training standards as the Legacy Carriers, while keeping their costs down. They require a highly skilled workforce, but generally pay lower wages then the
    Main Line. Due of the limited budgets of Regional airlines, a new or inexperienced Aircraft Mechanic at a Regional airline makes less then most car mechanics. Making it hard for Regional's to maintain a solid work force.


    Regional airlines offer a young aircraft technician an opportunity to learn the trade, trouble shoot skills on various Aircraft Systems, learn how to use the Manuals, clear understanding of Procedures and Record Keeping and various computer skills, and they do this in a small nurturing environment where talent and skills are shared.


    Main Line carriers should seize the opportunity they have created. When they entrust a Regional Airline to wear their brand and livery They should have an obligation to the Regional's a well.Let the Regional's do all of the leg work, let them train dedicated professional Aircraft Technicians and after a set amount of years give Regional mechanics a stepping stone to get an Aircraft Maintenance job with the Mainline. This is a win-win for everyone.



    The win for the Regional is that they can now keep their labor cost down, they would know how long a their average mechanic will stay in the company. Very few mechanics would ever reach the top scale pay before they moved on to a Mainline carrier. The hiring process would be less strained by offering new hire candidates the potential to move up to a Mainline.
    Regional's will have to pay their maintenance leadership positions appropriately, in general they would benefit from a work force that changes every 5 or so years. Generally the Regional's have a portion of their maintenance facilities in the smaller markets. Making aircraft maintenance jobs in a smaller cities limited mostly to Regional Airlines.


    Just recently a Regional that had went through a bankruptcy negotiated an agreement with their pilots and the Mainline carrier. As positions became available the Mainline would extend offers to the high time pilots of the Regional Airline.


    Time will show this is a good policy, it helps with employee moral and gives the mainline less of a learning curve. That was a good start by the Mainline, they should extend the same offer to the well deserved Professional Aircraft Maintenance Technicians that keep their Livery flying.
    I have to disagree with this. The best chance we have of increasing our compensation is for there to be a bidding war for us. I heard straight from an Eagle managers mouth that they believe they can pay substandard wages to the pilots and still attract them if they promise to let them go to American at some point.

    If you promise guys fresh out of school that they can flow to A/A at some point and you can attract guys using that as bait, what reason would they have to pay them anything more than McDonalds pay? In turn what incentive would American have to pay anybody any more than it takes to lure them across the ramp?

    i think this is a recipe for wage stagnation. Which is why I think it will probably happen.

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •