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Thread: Envoy being used for mainline flying

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    Envoy being used for mainline flying


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    https://www.avweb.com/aviation-news/...erican-routes/

    American Airlines is using regional jets owned by its subsidiary Envoy Air to fill in for bigger, thirstier aircraft on many domestic routes. The 58 ERJ-145s and 70 E175s normally feed hubs under the American Eagle brand but the main line has pressed them into service to save money in providing the basic service mandated under its federal COVID-19 relief agreements. “All of the E-175s and E-145s that we parked as a result of COVID-19 [are expected to be] returned to service by June 3,” the company said in a statement.

    Although bookings are increasing, many airliners flying the 5 percent or so of the schedules still operating are flying with only 15 to 20 percent occupancy. Using the smaller aircraft makes sense on some routes but not on others because while they cost less overall to fly than larger planes, their seat mile costs are higher. American has only deployed the aircraft flown by its subsidiary. PSA, Piedmont, Republic and SkyWest who also fly under the American Eagle brand will not be put in service on the main line. American owns PSA and Piedmont but Republic and Skywest are contractors.

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    Same company(AAG), transferring flying from one subsidiary(American) to another subsidiary (Envoy Air). 5% is too low. The industry needs at least 50% by September to avoid BIG furloughs. ⏰ ⏰ ⏰

    ONLY TIME WILL TELL!

    Transportation Security Administration’s (TSA) latest data showed that for the week ended Saturday, an average of 205,010 travelers per day went through TSA checkpoints, that’s down 91.5% from a year ago.
    Last edited by NoOtPilot; 05-18-2020 at 07:48 PM.

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    Meanwhile Air Canada is furloughing 1/2 the airline.

    https://aviationweek.com/air-transpo...7ba28e57321c61

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    Quote Originally Posted by Cujo665 View Post
    Meanwhile Air Canada is furloughing 1/2 the airline.

    https://aviationweek.com/air-transpo...7ba28e57321c61
    At least is not the top half...

    Boeing prospects a prolonged slump in air travel, which industry leaders estimate won't return to pre-pandemic levels for 3-5 years.
    Last edited by NoOtPilot; 05-18-2020 at 10:04 PM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jdflyer View Post
    https://www.avweb.com/aviation-news/...erican-routes/

    American Airlines is using regional jets owned by its subsidiary Envoy Air to fill in for bigger, thirstier aircraft on many domestic routes. The 58 ERJ-145s and 70 E175s normally feed hubs under the American Eagle brand but the main line has pressed them into service to save money in providing the basic service mandated under its federal COVID-19 relief agreements. “All of the E-175s and E-145s that we parked as a result of COVID-19 [are expected to be] returned to service by June 3,” the company said in a statement.

    Although bookings are increasing, many airliners flying the 5 percent or so of the schedules still operating are flying with only 15 to 20 percent occupancy. Using the smaller aircraft makes sense on some routes but not on others because while they cost less overall to fly than larger planes, their seat mile costs are higher. American has only deployed the aircraft flown by its subsidiary. PSA, Piedmont, Republic and SkyWest who also fly under the American Eagle brand will not be put in service on the main line. American owns PSA and Piedmont but Republic and Skywest are contractors.
    The good news continues!

    IATA, the international trade association, says recovery in air travel will lag economic activity. Domestic and short-haul air travel markets are expected to recover over the course of Q3, but long-haul markets will be slower to recommence. The average trip length will decline by around 8.5% this year. IATA predicts international air travel may not recover to 2019 levels until 2023-24. It also said social distancing would reduce the bookable seat capacity for airlines to 62% of normal capacity, but airlines on average break even only when 77% seats are filled. Raising prices would also be difficult amid low demand.

    May 20, 2020
    Last edited by NoOtPilot; 05-20-2020 at 10:08 AM.
    “I always tell the truth. Even when I lie.”

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    Quote Originally Posted by NoOtPilot View Post
    At least is not the top half...

    Boeing prospects a prolonged slump in air travel, which industry leaders estimate won't return to pre-pandemic levels for 3-5 years.
    True, as for more flying being done by the regionals for the AA brand, it only makes monetary sense to match the aircraft to the demand. I'd expect scope to be huge on the list during the bankruptcy. Oddly enough, it could be the reduced demand, and with scope the inablity to grow their small plane fleets, that forces the legacies to bring the RJ's back into the mainline companies. Wouldn't that be interesting? We already know from 2013-2014 that Parker and his cohorts were interested in the APA/EGL ALPA ideas on how the two pilot groups and company could be integrated while preserving most of the cost effectiveness of what essentially is a C-scale. AAG's big hang-up was that as well as we had done showing the pilot end (most expensive) labor group made it work; unless every major labor group did the same type of deal it was not going to happen. APA ran out of time to keep working on it as the SLI took all attention right around then. The TWU and AFA was never approached to the best of my knowledge.

    The point being, Parker and Group were interested so long as the same or similar metrics could be maintained. Moving a bunch of regional employees to mainline contracts didn't save them anything except the duplicate administrations which wasn't enough.

    Here's some spit-balling…..

    I would not be surprised to see Glass working to create more synergy between contracts with concessions "to save the company" and then at some point down the road, a bankruptcy reorganization that will eliminate scope, but creating one company from four. Scope restrictions will remain gone. Five years later as demand picks back up, they'll splinter off the small planes to a newly created wholly owned regional affiliate.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cujo665 View Post
    True, as for more flying being done by the regionals for the AA brand, it only makes monetary sense to match the aircraft to the demand. I'd expect scope to be huge on the list during the bankruptcy. Oddly enough, it could be the reduced demand, and with scope the inablity to grow their small plane fleets, that forces the legacies to bring the RJ's back into the mainline companies. Wouldn't that be interesting? We already know from 2013-2014 that Parker and his cohorts were interested in the APA/EGL ALPA ideas on how the two pilot groups and company could be integrated while preserving most of the cost effectiveness of what essentially is a C-scale. AAG's big hang-up was that as well as we had done showing the pilot end (most expensive) labor group made it work; unless every major labor group did the same type of deal it was not going to happen. APA ran out of time to keep working on it as the SLI took all attention right around then. The TWU and AFA was never approached to the best of my knowledge.

    The point being, Parker and Group were interested so long as the same or similar metrics could be maintained. Moving a bunch of regional employees to mainline contracts didn't save them anything except the duplicate administrations which wasn't enough.

    Here's some spit-balling…..

    I would not be surprised to see Glass working to create more synergy between contracts with concessions "to save the company" and then at some point down the road, a bankruptcy reorganization that will eliminate scope, but creating one company from four. Scope restrictions will remain gone. Five years later as demand picks back up, they'll splinter off the small planes to a newly created wholly owned regional affiliate.
    "during the bankruptcy."

    What bankruptcy?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Dacuj View Post
    "during the bankruptcy."

    What bankruptcy?
    The one AAG is filing, right after you get furlough.
    Last edited by NoOtPilot; 05-20-2020 at 07:12 PM.

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