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Thread: APA desperate plea

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    APA desperate plea


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    From APA..



    I recently received an e-mail from a fellow pilot who stated that he would rather see American Airlines liquidate than vote ?yes? for our current tentative agreement. That?s a bold statement, and along with some very positive correspondence, we?ve also received our share of similar ?chest thumping? via C&R, Soundoff, etc. While martyrdom in the manner of Eastern Airlines is one option, I do not believe that the majority of our pilots would prefer to embark upon a path of self-destruction in order to make a political point or poke management in the eye.

    I want to make clear that this is not a fantasy game of Dungeons and Dragons or Call of Duty. We are not on a fictional crusade to slay a mythical dragon or gun down the opposition. This is not a remake of ?Braveheart.? This is our future, and it is imperative that you understand that we currently hold that future in our hands.

    While there has always been a strong tradition of political opposition within our union, it has moved well beyond what could be defined as healthy, and in fact, it has become poisonous. There are those among us who are driven by a personal and political agenda that has little to do with successfully emerging from bankruptcy with our profession and our jobs still intact. Instead, a relatively small group of former APA officers and committee members who were fired, not re-elected or just plain quit have decided that their political agenda is more important than the needs of the line pilot. They have embarked on a campaign of F.U.D. laced with disinformation designed to appeal to our greatest fears and our most base elements. It is a strategy designed to evoke anger and suspicion. What they have failed to offer is anything that resembles a well thought-out acceptable alternative or solution. To a man, they adhere to what I would refer to as the ?Doctor Strangelove theory of mutual assured destruction?: Just strap on the nuke, ride it down to the target and simply wait for the mushroom cloud.

    While bankruptcy is undoubtedly an experience that creates a great deal of emotional anxiety, we must not let it color our good judgment. The decision before us must be made using the same calm, cool and collected approach that we use in the course of our decision-making process in flight.

    As I currently see it, we have two choices before us:

    Option 1: We can take off with a re-release flight plan (our current improved TA), with a very good chance of reaching our destination (industry standard). There may be a near-term divert or a fuel stop (a US Airways merger), but I am confident that we will arrive safely with our jet and our passengers intact, while upholding the value of our profession.
    Option 2: We can kick the tires, light the fire, brief on guard, skip the flight planning and we?ll worry about the destination if we?re lucky enough to reach cruise altitude. It?s off to the great unknown on a wing and prayer?
    My guess is that given those two choices, there are very few pilots who would knowingly take the second option, especially when the first choice sets a clear and defined path to what we seek. The fact of the matter is that this is the nature of bankruptcy ― tough choices. In that regard, I?m reminded of an old saying that my friends in the fighter community often used, and it may very well apply to our current situation: ?Don?t press a bad position.? And if there?s one thing we can all agree upon, it?s that bankruptcy is a very bad position to find oneself.
    What is important for you to understand is that the union leadership that was in place before my appointment has been continuously engaged in defending your contract and your profession well prior to AMR?s bankruptcy filing. To this point, we have outperformed every other pilot group that has been faced with the same situation. By recognizing the threat of bankruptcy months before the event happened, we were able to identify and retain a group of expert advisers who represent the best in their respective fields. Over the last year we have executed a comprehensive and integrated strategy that engaged AMR in every venue, whether it be filing multiple appeals or engaging in an unprecedented merger strategy with US Airways while still inside the bankruptcy process. This strategy and your solidarity have produced a conditional labor agreement with US Airways that we have effectively used to leverage AA management into a significantly improved TA. Dozens of dedicated volunteers, thousands of man-hours and millions of your dollars have been spent in this endeavor. Your unity and strength has enabled APA to make significant improvements to this tentative agreement.
    The choices before you are simple: capture the gains that you have enabled APA to secure or remain engaged in a game of ?Russian roulette? with two chambers in the revolver having already been turned. The latter means likely squandering all that has been negotiated thus far, with little likelihood of making additional gains. We must recognize that the high-risk strategy that some in our group continue to advocate has its limits, and at some point the ?risk-reward? equation will no longer be in our favor. I believe we have reached the point that economists refer to as diminished marginal returns, at which pushing for more will get us less. The choice is yours to make: Either brief on guard, or take the re-release flight plan and move on to our destination.

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    Registered User Flugschlafen's Avatar
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    I suspect this TA will pass. I have heard some say they'll vote no, but the rumble on the other side of the fence is much quieter.

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    As someone who has watched all the BK's since 9/11 it boggles my mind that some of these AA pilots feel that they should accept no less than DAL pay. I feel like slapping them in the face and saying WTFO! What they need to see is what DAL and UAL contacts looked like in BK, not six years later. And yes I agree they (aa pilots) have given everything to help the company, but if 3 to 4 years down the road you could be at DAL pay thats not too bad.

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    Registered User Divine Wind's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Flugschlafen View Post
    I suspect this TA will pass. I have heard some say they'll vote no, but the rumble on the other side of the fence is much quieter.
    Agreed. Talk is cheap. Actually voting to liquidate AMR seems to be false bravado at best and suicidal at worst.

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    They've gotten what they can. There are now more reasons to vote yes; than to vote no.

    Commuter Aircraft

    Q: Can Eagle operate AA Airbus aircraft, specifically the A319?



    A: No.

    Under our Scope Clause, AE is an Affiliate and is not able to fly aircraft larger than 76 seats or an 86,000 pound MTOW limit.

    The term Affiliate is defined in Section 1.B.1 of the contract as follows:


    ?The term "Affiliate" refers to (a) any entity that Controls the Company or any entity that the Company Controls, and/or (b) any other corporate subsidiary, parent, or entity Controlled by or that Controls any entity referred to in (a) above.?


    Q: Is the AA TA ?commuter aircraft? 76-seat and 86,000 pound MTOW limit the same as what is in the DAL contract and UAL?s TA?

    A: Yes.

    Note that DAL?s contract allows 36 ?grandfathered? E-175s with a MTOW of 89,000 pounds.


    Q: Can AMR get around the 76-seat/86,000 pound MTOW limit if that aircraft is later certified at > 86,000 pounds?

    A: No.

    Any aircraft with a certificated MTOW of greater than 86,000 pounds cannot be added as a ?commuter aircraft.?

    Certificated in the United States is industry standard to DAL and the UAL TA.

    The language is clear in all three contracts (APA TA, UAL TA & DAL contract) that commuter aircraft are only those certificated in the U.S. for 86,000 pounds or less. This also means that if an aircraft that is certificated for over 86,000 pounds and is later re-certificated for less than 86,000 pounds, that re-certificated aircraft will not qualify as a ?commuter aircraft.?



    AA TA contractual language

    ?The term ?Commuter Aircraft? means aircraft (jet or turboprop) that (a) have a maximum of seventy-six (76) seats (as operated for American Airlines) and (b) are not certificated in the United States with a maximum gross takeoff weight (MTOW) of more than 86,000 pounds.?



    Q: Are the AA TA limits on the total number of 76-seat ?commuter aircraft? anything like the DAL contract and the UAL TA?

    A: Yes.

    For baseline reference ?

    Current commuter aircraft count:

    AMR = 281 commuter aircraft/58% of narrowbody fleet

    DAL = 564 commuter aircraft/100% of narrowbody fleet

    UAL = 550 commuter aircraft/101% of narrowbody fleet


    The DAL contract, the UAL TA and the AA TA all use varying methods to control the proportional number of small and large RJs to mainline aircraft but the limits in the Tentative Agreement are more restrictive than those in the other contracts. For the sake of relative comparison purposes, the table below represents a comparison using the AA TA total RJ proportion of 65% and large RJ maximum 40% proportion (in 2016) to mainline narrowbody fleet count and DAL/UAL TA maximums (DAL after 50 seat reduction schedule and UAL in 2016) large and total RJ count using the current narrowbody fleet count:


    Q: Is there anything in the Scope clause that prevents AMR from buying aircraft with more than 76 seats or greater than 86,000 pound MTOW limit and leasing them to Eagle?


    A: The Scope clause prevents Eagle from operating any aircraft larger than 76 seats or an 86,000 pound MTOW limit as long as Eagle is an Affiliate.



    Codeshare

    Q: With 50% codeshare could AMR transfer 50% of our flying to a codeshare partner and cut our flying in half?


    A: No.


    Codeshare in the new contract is in proportion to AA?s scheduled domestic mainline ASMs. If AA?s scheduled domestic mainline ASMs decrease then the amount that AA is allowed to codeshare decreases. The 2003 CBA gave the Company to ability to do almost unlimited domestic codesharing via 1.H, given the ?industry standard.? Since 2003 AA has done domestic codesharing on a handful of routes by Alaska. The codeshare landscape has changed. The new United CBA has virtually no limits on codesharing. The 50% restriction on domestic codesharing is a ?gain? from the 2003 CBA. What APA changed with the TA with respect to domestic codesharing is the spoke-to-hub restriction. This was done so that the Company could use JetBlue, specifically their slots, to feed JFK international flying and Alaska feed into LAX to feed LAX international flying.
    Not perfect, but it will get enough to pass IMHO.
    Last edited by Cujo665; 11-21-2012 at 10:01 AM.

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    I'm below 300 on AA seniority list, and it's a solid NO vote for me, I've been a corporate, 135, commuter, 121 pilot for more than 30 years, and I've only seen our profession go backwards since deregulation in 1978, I cannot standby and vote yes for an agreement that will only enrich management while continuing to demigrate this job for the guys/girls that will follow.

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    Quote Originally Posted by jacsbck View Post
    I'm below 300 on AA seniority list, and it's a solid NO vote for me, I've been a corporate, 135, commuter, 121 pilot for more than 30 years, and I've only seen our profession go backwards since deregulation in 1978, I cannot standby and vote yes for an agreement that will only enrich management while continuing to demigrate this job for the guys/girls that will follow.
    I think should be closer to Delta pay myself.

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